Phoenix Rising

In January all of my sites got obliterated. I used HostMDS as my webhost because they were inexpensive, but my shoestring approach to site management bit me in the end. The server that my sites were hosted on went down. Although other accounts on the server were recovered, sadly, my sites were not saved. In addition, this webhost’s customer service was awful. Actually, I can’t say that because they really had no customer service strategy. Although they were aware of the severity of the situation, they never reached out to contact me. For a period of one week, I had to keep contacting them to check on the status. Very poor customer experience. And as Peter Merholz indicated, the experience is the product – the experience can make or break who you retain as a customer.

I’ve since switched to DreamHost, particularly liking that they offer an easy way to have Google host your domain email. I realize I could do this myself, but it was a nice built-in feature.

I’ve made it over one hurdle so far: resurrecting old content. The good news is that I made a backup of my database. The bad news is that my last backup was a year ago. Thanks to some tips from Alex King and figaro, I was able to import my old database. And, praise to Google Reader. Fortunately, I subscribed to my own blog feed, so all of my lost posts from this past year are saved via Google’s cache, so I will slowly rebuild old posts while I plan to add new content.

So there may be a few growing pains as I try to fully resurrect the site (and give it a facelift). The moral of the story is to always backup, even on remote servers. But the good news is that WordPress now supports automatic backups.

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